5 Ways To Reduce Asthma Attacks In Children

According to the CDC the rate of asthma in children in America has increased by 50% from 2001 to 2009. Unfortunately, there is no concrete evidence as to why the rates are rising so rapidly; just theories that people are trying to connect to this new epidemic.

If you have a child who suffers from asthmatic attacks I would like to let you in on some non-medical ways that can help you reduce the severity of such attacks:

1) Keep Your Pets Brushed and Clean

It is important to realize that pets are a common trigger for asthmatic attacks. So you need to take extra caution to make sure that your pets are washed and brushed regularly. This eliminates excess hair and dander scales floating around your home, which are responsible for such attacks. It is also a good idea to keep the bedrooms in your house “no pet zones.” The best way to avoid an asthma attack is to avoid the allergen.

2) Keep Stuffed Animals Washed

Many asthma inducing allergens can lay hidden in your child’s favorite stuffed animal. It is important that you keep these items washed regularly – at least 2 times per month. Prior to washing, stick the stuff animals in a pillowcase to prevent wear and tear. Afterwards, make sure the stuffed animals are thoroughly dried. For further prevention of any allergens place the stuffed toys in the freezer for 24 hours once weekly.

3) Vacuum Your Home Daily

Much like stuffed animals, floors are a cesspool for possible asthma triggers. Vacuuming can be an extremely important part in keeping the problem under control. Invest in a vacuum with a good filtration system that does not allow for debris and dust to recirculate. Regular replacement and cleaning of vacuum filters is also suggested to maximize suction power to reach deep inset fibers.

4) Unscented Products

Scented candles, cleaning products, and perfumes should be avoided when living with a child with asthma. Benzene and toluene are two common chemicals found in scented products that trigger asthma attacks in children. Many people with asthma report that they cannot handle scented candles even if they are not burning. Many common household products emit chemicals that are not only dangerous for those with asthma but for healthy individuals as well. Local natural shops and grocery stores usually have a section where you can find natural, non-invasive products that will be safe for you and your child. There are also many resources available online to make safe and effective DIY home cleaning products.

5) Vitamin D

Recent studies have shown a correlation between vitamin D and asthma. Vitamin D helps to boost the immune system which helps to fight off allergens that trigger asthma attacks. It is also known as an anti inflammatory which may help build healthy airways thus reducing attacks. Although, these studies did not claim that vitamin D helped in the prevention of asthma, they did show a decrease in the frequency of attacks in patients already suffering from asthma. The RDI for kids is 400 IU daily. A liquid form or a chewable tablet are the most favorable deliveries for kids.

Kevin